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Washburn Guitar Shredding


Stargazer

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I played this footage through my Scarlett Solo Audio Interface to Logic X. There I used th Fortin Nameless Plugin (Neural DSP). I used my studio monitors to play the sound.

There is a minimal amount of EQ also. I played "random riffs" also, but the specific riffs are mentioned in the description of the video. The color of the guitar is dark blue (sapphire), but looks more dark when there is less light.

 

Edited by Stargazer
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Yes. I played drums when I was 13, then I took classical paino lessons for 3 years, when I was about 15. Then I had a small break, then I made midi music with a DAW (Logic in this case.) I fully produce my own songs. I have studied music for the last 2,5 years in Finland full-time, so I have also studied a lot of Pop/Jazz-theory during this time. I have played live as well. I have also studied sound-physics (If you have to know only one thing about sound physics, study the harmonic series/overtone series.) My strongest instruments are the drums, the piano, and now the electric guitar. Though because of my vast background, I can learn basically any instrument quite fast. This is my CV basically.

Here is the link to the mathematical version of the harmonic series:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harmonic_series_(mathematics)

The musical version:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harmonic_series_(music)

Every note on an isntrument plays every note of the harmonic series, relative to the "fundament" (base note). For instance, if you play "C" on a guitar, the "C" is the base note, the fundament, and every other notes (or frequency) from the harmonic series are played as well, but much quieter. The thickness of the frequency varies, and all instruments do not play all notes of the harmonic series. This applies to every physical instrument (drum tuning as well, though it is not very melodic.) The melodic harmonic series in one picture:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harmonic_series_(music)#/media/File:Harmonic_series_intervals.png

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More Guitar Shredding.  I used a Boss Katana Amplifier this time. The video contains the exact Amplifier values, if you want to use my Katana preset. It was filmed in Kuopion Konservatorio (Kuopio Conservatory.) There are many famous riffs in the footage. Maybe you can spot some. 

 

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On 11/2/2021 at 10:55 AM, Stargazer said:

Every note on an isntrument plays every note of the harmonic series, relative to the "fundament" (base note). For instance, if you play "C" on a guitar, the "C" is the base note, the fundament, and every other notes (or frequency) from the harmonic series are played as well, but much quieter. The thickness of the frequency varies, and all instruments do not play all notes of the harmonic series. This applies to every physical instrument (drum tuning as well, though it is not very melodic.) The melodic harmonic series in one picture:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harmonic_series_(music)#/media/File:Harmonic_series_intervals.png

Wow this musical science is well beyond my pay grade! But interesting nonetheless, this is the first thing I hear of harmonic series. I don't get how say a pinched string can vibrate with different frequencies at the same time, but my physics notions are very basic.

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  • 3 months later...
On 11/2/2021 at 5:55 PM, Stargazer said:

Yes. I played drums when I was 13, then I took classical paino lessons for 3 years, when I was about 15. Then I had a small break, then I made midi music with a DAW (Logic in this case.) I fully produce my own songs. I have studied music for the last 2,5 years in Finland full-time, so I have also studied a lot of Pop/Jazz-theory during this time. I have played live as well. I have also studied sound-physics comparateur assurance chat (If you have to know only one thing about sound physics, study the harmonic series/overtone series.) My strongest instruments are the drums, the piano, and now the electric guitar. Though because of my vast background, I can learn basically any instrument quite fast. This is my CV basically.

Here is the link to the mathematical version of the harmonic series:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harmonic_series_(mathematics)

The musical version:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harmonic_series_(music)

Every note on an isntrument plays every note of the harmonic series, relative to the "fundament" (base note). For instance, if you play "C" on a guitar, the "C" is the base note, the fundament, and every other notes (or frequency) from the harmonic series are played as well, but much quieter. The thickness of the frequency varies, and all instruments do not play all notes of the harmonic series. This applies to every physical instrument (drum tuning as well, though it is not very melodic.) The melodic harmonic series in one picture:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harmonic_series_(music)#/media/File:Harmonic_series_intervals.png

We can say that you know how to play almost all the instruments. Maybe you could teach us.

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6 hours ago, ClaraM18 said:

We can say that you know how to play almost all the instruments. Maybe you could teach us.

Stargazer's full of talent for sure, check out his YouTube channel!

By the way, welcome to the forums, feel free to look around and join in the conversations. 👍

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